A set of nearly weekly questions from the Longmire Book Club answered by author Craig Johnson about the Longmire literary universe. Simply click on any title to read Craig’s answer which will open in a new window.

#26 Boarding School Blues

“In Daughter of the Morning Star, the photo of the young ones at the school was faded except for the one face. Did that mean that the one person is still alive?” - Mary Murray

#25: “And The Horse You Rode In On”

“Idea: A story or book from the perspective of Walt’s horse.” - Jane Dusek

#24 Soothing the Savage Beast

“I discovered the music of Phillip Aaberg because of a reference you made in an interview. Do you create different musical set-lists for each book you write?” - Janet Yager

#23 Up on the Rooftop

“You have often said that people in real life end up in your stories. Who was your inspiration for the character Geo Stewart in Junkyard Dogs? That is perhaps the most-read story in my collection. I love laughing out loud. And also, did the chimney, roof, rope to the car and somebody being dragged from the back end of the car really happen to someone you know?” - Ingrid De Groot Mannisto

#22 – “Jefferson Had An Airplane?”

I will add to the question about the music in Craig’s books. In The Western Star, Grace Slick makes an appearance. Music is obviously important to Craig. When you add certain songs/characters to your books is it a spur of the moment decision or planned in advance? - Tim Sager

#21 Sweets for the Sweet

Why did you choose Mallo Cups as Virgil’s calling card? - Scott McCreery

#20 On the Beach

Will there be a book about Walt on a December vacation with Vic on the Caribbean Island and getting drawn into something? Maybe include a little voodoo … Do you have an “idea folder” where you jot down little ideas, sayings, quotes that may (or may not) fit some future story? If so, how full is it? - Randy Murphy

#19 Beautiful Downtown Hatch

Do Walt and Vic ever get to Hatch, New Mexico like he always wants to do? - Mary Negus

#18 Things That Go Bump In The Night

I have seen a theme of visions and spirits in your stories, beginning with The Cold Dish. I love it, and it appears the theme is getting more intense -- especially in Daughter Of The Morning Star. Does this have anything to do with Walt’s deep connection with the land and the Cheyenne? - Liz Snair

#17 The Industry of Young Men

Why did Henry live with his grandmother in high school? - Corey Arnett

#16 – “No More Pencils, No More Books”

It might be interesting for Walt and/or Henry to get involved in something if they visited either one of their alma maters. - Wayne Heggemeier

#15 – “The Great White North”

I enjoy reading 52 Pickup and the insights into the World of Walt as well as Inuit writing. Could we please learn more about Walt’s time in Alaska? - Roxane Fridirici

#14 – “Twenty-five or Twenty-six?”

So, are you going to change your Instagram and Twitter handles to Ucrosspop26? - Nina Adams

#13 – “Who You Know…”

I’ve started writing my first novel and have been having trouble keeping things straight, how do you keep everything in your head with eighteen novels? - Arlen Roth

#12 – “The Best Medicine”

One of the joys of reading your books is the humor; I always find myself laughing out loud, and I was just wondering how important that is to your writing process and what writers make you laugh? - Mike Reeves

#11 – “A Land Far, Far Away”

I’m just curious, when I read your books, I sometimes have a map and follow the roads and trails you use in your novels and they’re pretty accurate for Johnson County and Bighorn surroundings -- why did you decide to develop the fictitious Absaroka County in your books? - Donald Zane

#10 – “They’re Riding Shetland Ponies”

Just an observational question. Why is Longmire’s head always down on the cover of the books? - Kathy Golden Frisch

#9 – “On The Road Again”

I just saw you posted a huge tour for Hell And Back, your newest novel and was wondering if you ever got tired of doing events? It seems like you do a lot all year round. - Dave Hughes

#8 - “Extra, extra... Read all about it”

I’m always amazed at the topicality of your novels, the social issues that are dealt with such as the plight of murdered and missing Indigenous women in Daughter of the Morning Star and from the small amount I’ve read of Hell And Back, the situation concerning Native boarding schools. How do you choose these issues for your books? - Julie Powers

#7, “Walt & Not-Walt”

I’m consistently surprised at the things you have and don’t have in common with your character Walt Longmire. I know Walt doesn’t like motorcycles, but you have several. Walt doesn’t have a cell phone, but I’ve seen photos of you with one. Walt doesn’t like donuts, but you’ve professed a love of them -- how do you decide where you and Walt are the same and where you part company? - Vera Skordos

#6, “The Long Haul”

You’ve said on multiple occasions that you plant characters or quick references that are seemingly random in your books and that allows you to build the story arc for the next or another book in the series. Just how many more books do you have in you? I believe we’re about 4 years into Walt’s life, so I do anticipate many more. Sorry for being selfish and possibly adding to the reason your hands will continue to cramp up, but Walt is a joy to read and to aspire to be more like. Thank you. - Jason Dildine

#5, “Letting the Cat Out of the Bag to Spill the Beans”

When you go out on your book tours, is it difficult to keep on track the book you are promoting, or do you sometimes let out tidbits from the upcoming book? - Eileen Everitt

26 PICK-UP - THE HALF TON

© Craig Johnson All Rights Reserved

Author Of
A set of nearly weekly questions from the Longmire Book Club answered by author Craig Johnson about the Longmire literary universe. Simply click on any title to read Craig’s answer which will open in a new window.

#26 Boarding School Blues

“In Daughter of the Morning Star, the photo of the young ones at the school was faded except for the one face. Did that mean that the one person is still alive?” - Mary Murray

#25: “And The Horse You Rode In On”

“Idea: A story or book from the perspective of Walt’s horse.” - Jane Dusek

#24 Soothing the Savage Beast

“I discovered the music of Phillip Aaberg because of a reference you made in an interview. Do you create different musical set-lists for each book you write?” - Janet Yager

#23 Up on the Rooftop

“You have often said that people in real life end up in your stories. Who was your inspiration for the character Geo Stewart in Junkyard Dogs? That is perhaps the most- read story in my collection. I love laughing out loud. And also, did the chimney, roof, rope to the car and somebody being dragged from the back end of the car really happen to someone you know?” - Ingrid De Groot Mannisto

#22 – “Jefferson Had An Airplane?”

I will add to the question about the music in Craig’s books. In The Western Star, Grace Slick makes an appearance. Music is obviously important to Craig. When you add certain songs/characters to your books is it a spur of the moment decision or planned in advance? - Tim Sager

#21 Sweets for the Sweet

Why did you choose Mallo Cups as Virgil’s calling card? - Scott McCreery

#20 On the Beach

Will there be a book about Walt on a December vacation with Vic on the Caribbean Island and getting drawn into something? Maybe include a little voodoo … Do you have an “idea folder” where you jot down little ideas, sayings, quotes that may (or may not) fit some future story? If so, how full is it? - Randy Murphy

#19 Beautiful Downtown Hatch

Do Walt and Vic ever get to Hatch, New Mexico like he always wants to do? - Mary Negus

#18 Things That Go Bump In The Night

I have seen a theme of visions and spirits in your stories, beginning with The Cold Dish. I love it, and it appears the theme is getting more intense -- especially in Daughter Of The Morning Star. Does this have anything to do with Walt’s deep connection with the land and the Cheyenne? - Liz Snair

#17 The Industry of Young Men

Why did Henry live with his grandmother in high school? - Corey Arnett

#16 – “No More Pencils, No More Books”

It might be interesting for Walt and/or Henry to get involved in something if they visited either one of their alma maters. - Wayne Heggemeier

#15 – “The Great White North”

I enjoy reading 52 Pickup and the insights into the World of Walt as well as Inuit writing. Could we please learn more about Walt’s time in Alaska? - Roxane Fridirici

#14 – “Twenty-five or Twenty-six?”

So, are you going to change your Instagram and Twitter handles to Ucrosspop26? - Nina Adams

#13 – “Who You Know…”

I’ve started writing my first novel and have been having trouble keeping things straight, how do you keep everything in your head with eighteen novels? - Arlen Roth

#12 – “The Best Medicine”

One of the joys of reading your books is the humor; I always find myself laughing out loud, and I was just wondering how important that is to your writing process and what writers make you laugh? - Mike Reeves

#11 – “A Land Far, Far Away”

I’m just curious, when I read your books, I sometimes have a map and follow the roads and trails you use in your novels and they’re pretty accurate for Johnson County and Bighorn surroundings -- why did you decide to develop the fictitious Absaroka County in your books? - Donald Zane

#10 – “They’re Riding Shetland Ponies”

Just an observational question. Why is Longmire’s head always down on the cover of the books? - Kathy Golden Frisch

#9 – “On The Road Again”

I just saw you posted a huge tour for Hell And Back, your newest novel and was wondering if you ever got tired of doing events? It seems like you do a lot all year round. - Dave Hughes

#8 - “Extra, extra... Read all about it”

I’m always amazed at the topicality of your novels, the social issues that are dealt with such as the plight of murdered and missing Indigenous women in Daughter of the Morning Star and from the small amount I’ve read of Hell And Back, the situation concerning Native boarding schools. How do you choose these issues for your books? - Julie Powers

#7, “Walt & Not-Walt”

I’m consistently surprised at the things you have and don’t have in common with your character Walt Longmire. I know Walt doesn’t like motorcycles, but you have several. Walt doesn’t have a cell phone, but I’ve seen photos of you with one. Walt doesn’t like donuts, but you’ve professed a love of them -- how do you decide where you and Walt are the same and where you part company? - Vera Skordos

#6, “The Long Haul”

You’ve said on multiple occasions that you plant characters or quick references that are seemingly random in your books and that allows you to build the story arc for the next or another book in the series. Just how many more books do you have in you? I believe we’re about 4 years into Walt’s life, so I do anticipate many more. Sorry for being selfish and possibly adding to the reason your hands will continue to cramp up, but Walt is a joy to read and to aspire to be more like. Thank you. - Jason Dildine

#5, “Letting the Cat Out of the Bag to Spill the Beans”

When you go out on your book tours, is it difficult to keep on track the book you are promoting, or do you sometimes let out tidbits from the upcoming book? - Eileen Everitt

26 PICK-UP - THE HALF TON

© Craig Johnson All Rights Reserved

Author Of
A set of nearly weekly questions from the Longmire Book Club answered by author Craig Johnson about the Longmire literary universe. Simply click on any title to read Craig’s answer which will open in a new window.

#26 Boarding School Blues

“In Daughter of the Morning Star, the photo of the young ones at the school was faded except for the one face. Did that mean that the one person is still alive?” - Mary Murray

#25: “And The Horse You Rode In On”

“Idea: A story or book from the perspective of Walt’s horse.” - Jane Dusek

#24 Soothing the Savage Beast

“I discovered the music of Phillip Aaberg because of a reference you made in an interview. Do you create different musical set-lists for each book you write?” - Janet Yager

#23 Up on the Rooftop

“You have often said that people in real life end up in your stories. Who was your inspiration for the character Geo Stewart in Junkyard Dogs? That is perhaps the most-read story in my collection. I love laughing out loud. And also, did the chimney, roof, rope to the car and somebody being dragged from the back end of the car really happen to someone you know?” - Ingrid De Groot Mannisto

#22 – “Jefferson Had An Airplane?”

I will add to the question about the music in Craig’s books. In The Western Star, Grace Slick makes an appearance. Music is obviously important to Craig. When you add certain songs/characters to your books is it a spur of the moment decision or planned in advance? - Tim Sager

#21 Sweets for the Sweet

Why did you choose Mallo Cups as Virgil’s calling card? - Scott McCreery

#20 On the Beach

Will there be a book about Walt on a December vacation with Vic on the Caribbean Island and getting drawn into something? Maybe include a little voodoo … Do you have an “idea folder” where you jot down little ideas, sayings, quotes that may (or may not) fit some future story? If so, how full is it? - Randy Murphy

#19 Beautiful Downtown Hatch

Do Walt and Vic ever get to Hatch, New Mexico like he always wants to do? - Mary Negus

#18 Things That Go Bump In The Night

I have seen a theme of visions and spirits in your stories, beginning with The Cold Dish. I love it, and it appears the theme is getting more intense -- especially in Daughter Of The Morning Star. Does this have anything to do with Walt’s deep connection with the land and the Cheyenne? - Liz Snair

#17 The Industry of Young Men

Why did Henry live with his grandmother in high school? - Corey Arnett

#16 – “No More Pencils, No More Books”

It might be interesting for Walt and/or Henry to get involved in something if they visited either one of their alma maters. - Wayne Heggemeier

#15 – “The Great White North”

I enjoy reading 52 Pickup and the insights into the World of Walt as well as Inuit writing. Could we please learn more about Walt’s time in Alaska? - Roxane Fridirici

#14 – “Twenty-five or Twenty-six?”

So, are you going to change your Instagram and Twitter handles to Ucrosspop26? - Nina Adams

#13 – “Who You Know…”

I’ve started writing my first novel and have been having trouble keeping things straight, how do you keep everything in your head with eighteen novels? - Arlen Roth

#12 – “The Best Medicine”

One of the joys of reading your books is the humor; I always find myself laughing out loud, and I was just wondering how important that is to your writing process and what writers make you laugh? - Mike Reeves

#11 – “A Land Far, Far Away”

I’m just curious, when I read your books, I sometimes have a map and follow the roads and trails you use in your novels and they’re pretty accurate for Johnson County and Bighorn surroundings -- why did you decide to develop the fictitious Absaroka County in your books? - Donald Zane

#10 – “They’re Riding Shetland Ponies”

Just an observational question. Why is Longmire’s head always down on the cover of the books? - Kathy Golden Frisch

#9 – “On The Road Again”

I just saw you posted a huge tour for Hell And Back, your newest novel and was wondering if you ever got tired of doing events? It seems like you do a lot all year round. - Dave Hughes

#8 - “Extra, extra... Read all about it”

I’m always amazed at the topicality of your novels, the social issues that are dealt with such as the plight of murdered and missing Indigenous women in Daughter of the Morning Star and from the small amount I’ve read of Hell And Back, the situation concerning Native boarding schools. How do you choose these issues for your books? - Julie Powers

#7, “Walt & Not-Walt”

I’m consistently surprised at the things you have and don’t have in common with your character Walt Longmire. I know Walt doesn’t like motorcycles, but you have several. Walt doesn’t have a cell phone, but I’ve seen photos of you with one. Walt doesn’t like donuts, but you’ve professed a love of them -- how do you decide where you and Walt are the same and where you part company? - Vera Skordos

#6, “The Long Haul”

You’ve said on multiple occasions that you plant characters or quick references that are seemingly random in your books and that allows you to build the story arc for the next or another book in the series. Just how many more books do you have in you? I believe we’re about 4 years into Walt’s life, so I do anticipate many more. Sorry for being selfish and possibly adding to the reason your hands will continue to cramp up, but Walt is a joy to read and to aspire to be more like. Thank you. - Jason Dildine

#5, “Letting the Cat Out of the Bag to Spill

the Beans”

When you go out on your book tours, is it difficult to keep on track the book you are promoting, or do you sometimes let out tidbits from the upcoming book? - Eileen Everitt

26 PICK-UP -

THE HALF TON

© Craig Johnson All Rights Reserved
Author Of